Sunday, March 16, 2008

Donkeys and Horses



It's not until one gets away from Marrakech for a little while that you realise what a commonplace part the livestock play in everyday life.
In Manhattan, I may see a police horse once in a while. But I never see donkeys hauling anything.
This character above was waiting by a building site in Mouassine.



The caleches one sees all over the place aren't just for tourists. Late in the afternoon whole families climb aboard and drive down derb Dabachi heading home.
I'm sure they don't pay the enormous prices the caleche drivers want from me.
So I only go in caleches with Ghislan. She thinks it's very odd that there aren't any in common use in New York. The ones in Central Park don't count really.



This picture - taken from Cafe France - shows the usual modes of transportation here.
Feet
Bicycles
Caleches
and, of course, the dreaded mopeds.



Two donkeys hanging about waiting on derb Djedid.
Quite a lot of most donkeys lives are spent waiting patiently for things.



This last donkey is waiting for something or other just near the mellah market on a very busy street.
I was sorry when I heard that most Moroccan donkeys don't have names.
They are just called 'the donkey'.

25 comments:

travelingmama said...

We have a horse that seems to live in the middle of our street. He wanders around and no one ever seems to notice. Will I ever get used to our new home?

Anonymous said...

You've given me an idea for a variant on my cat calendar: the donkey calendar!!
Love
Joan

Elizabeth said...

Mama:
I once saw a white horse -all on his own - wandering round the traffic circle/roundabout in Gueliz near Asima, the supermarket. In the middle of all the swirling traffic.
It was there I saw the man with the peacock under his arm.

Joan: Donkey calendar sounds cool!

Kate and Roger Skophammer said...

I am glad you changed from cafes. Your last post made me so hungry. I really should take more pictures of my area. It is quite beautiful here right now.

PG said...

Oh what is it about donkeys? They are so sweet and humble...
I was pretty awed to find that you know Frances, I love reading her blog; not only is it New York but we have lives at different ends of the spectrum! You are right, the Internet moves in mysterious ways...

Julie at Virtual Voyage said...

Odd that the donkeys don't have names - interesting to see photos of them working (or waiting!)

Joanna said...

How nice the streets of london would be with horses. I love donkeys. I have emailed Julia as I too had been wondering what has happened and she has decided not to carry on with her blog sadly, taking up too much time etc. She might come back with another one or some thing. How exciting you are going to see some english countryside with your visit to your brothers. If you get out and about south of guildford in the south downs your welcome to pop by for a cup of english tea1

High Desert Diva said...

I love the first donkey photo...

Received The Three Graces in the mail last week...will start it as soon as the other two books I'm reading are finished...can't wait!

Vienna for Beginners said...

Imagining donkey in Manhattan really made me smile. :-)))
I always feel a lot of empathy when I see donkeys. I wonder if they are rewarded a good home for their hard work.

Lora said...

What an interesting blog! I just found you via Britt-Arnhild. I've been fascinated by Morocco since seeing Casablana years ago. Someday I'd love to see it! I know I'll be back here often.

Sara said...

Donkeys certainly are patient creatures...at least they seem so from what you posted here (I've never met one in person)...

There are many interesting forms of transportation there...thanks for the little tour.

Karen Cole said...

Didn't think donkeys could be so beautiful.

Barbara said...

Nice post. The donkeys certainly earn their keep.

Willow said...

Oh the poor donkeys with no names! I shall name them all!
Ali, Basha, Cali, Dafar, Evram and all the letters of the alphabet.

Donkeys do seem to be very patient animals. Maybe they are just happy to be able to rest a little during the busy day.

My Castle in Spain said...

Hi Elizabeth,

Such darling donkeys ! and yes sadly without a name. Here too, people still have donkeys but mainly to carry stuff from the fields...

Loved your post below about cafés..your blog really makes me want to go back to Morrocco more often...
See you soon

Lala

Elizabeth said...

Willow:
I really want a donkey very much!
It would certainly have a name.
I think Neddy was a populatr donkey name in Edwardian times.
However, I don't have any grass.
There is a society of English ladies in Fez (or there used to be) who rescue poor old donkeys and let them end their days doing nothing in fields.I hope this is true.
Of course one must put people first but still...........

Barrie said...

What amazing photos. So different where you are compared to where I am. I visited S. Korea once and they are crazy for their mopeds. Which drive on the sidewalk too. I almost got mowed over by the Pizza Hut mopd!

neulekirppu said...

Lovely post.
Our Black Rabbit promised to put on Calendar Business on last Christmas. :-D
She wrote that there should be all kind of waiting calendars.E.G. such as waiting for birthday calendar, waiting for summer etc.

Barbara Jacksier said...

When we first moved to the semi-rural suburb of Washington DC in the early 90s, our neighbor had a horse and a donkey. Their barn was closer to our house than theirs and my son volunteered to feed them. They have both passed on and our neighbors (who once kept a herd of cows in the barn) no longer feel the urge to house anything more than a family of bats and birds in their barn. I miss the four-legged creatures.

Frank Gardner said...

I love donkeys too. There are certainly a lot of them around here. We used to have two, but one got sick and the other was stolen. For sure he was put to work, something that he was not used to with us.

rochambeau said...

"The Donkeys" are the way to go. It would make me happy to see donkeys instead of auto's on the main streets. The last donkey guy has the biggest and cutest ears!
Happy night to you!
Constance

christine mercer-vernon said...

i can't believe the donkeys stay right where they are left! when i lived in the 'mountains' of upstate PA, people rode their horses into town all the time, they even had hitching posts around town for them. it was such a relaxed way of living. i don't think there is such a thing as horse (or donkey) rage while riding...

Mary Sheehan Winn said...

What fabulous photos.
Donkeys are such sweet creatures.
They should have names though.
My heart goes out to all 'work' animals. It doesn't escape me that it is because I can drive a car, that I'm not having to use a donkey.
Thanks for sharing.

this is my patch said...

It always amazes me how these animals don't seem to be at all preturbed by the traffic. They are very patient and docile. I enjoy seeing your diary of daily life in Morocco. x

patsysunshine said...

I am unsure of how patient the donkeys in Marrakech are. I realise that families rely on donkeys for work and income, but really there is never any need for animal cruelty. Most donkeys which I see are not treated so good. It is not a case of patience, it is a case of being hit very hard if they move. Would you move if you were beaten with a stick. It pains me to live in Marrakech and see the sadness of these lovely creatures. Work, yes, cruelty, definatly NOT!!